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Youth Mentor - Shanaiah Geddes

Posted: Jan 17, 2020

My name is Shanaiah Geddes I am 17 years old attending Scott Collegiate and graduating June, 2020. I’m a new student at the University of Regina, studying police studies to receive my bachelor’s degree within the next 5 years. I’m working hard to achieve my goals I’ve dreamed of since I was 6, which was to be a city police officer. I’ve moved around a lot but have lived here in Regina for 4 years. I’m from Keys First Nations.  I enjoy doing sketches and acrylic painting, but love playing and learning guitar. Many sports and Jiu Jitsu I absolutely take delight in, but most of all I adore being around the people I love.

I personally think a leader inspires someone to try their best, who helps anyone in any way they can, placing themselves before others. Leaders make little or big changes, whether it be in the community or in someone's life. They teach but also learn many important lessons too.  Everyone is a leader.  It is up to each of us to decide if we will be a positive leader for the young or old.

It’s important to be a part of the community and to teach and spend time with the next generation. I enjoy teaching and getting to know the children of GYM as they grow.  I like giving to the children what I didn’t get when I was young, so it’s a great opportunity for them to make friends and to be in a friendly environment. I learned how to control my behavior especially when I was upset.  I’ve been less timid after joining the team and growing along with the children. We can all learn something from anyone at any age.

Future ambitions I hope to become a city police officer or joining the military. I love helping and being a part of a team, I like being able to move around other than staying in one area. I want the basics to living when I’m older, like owning a place along with a job. I don’t need much as long as I’m grateful and content.

The biggest challenge I face is feeling emotionally well as I’ve been diagnosed with c-PTSD at a young age. I keep pushing and pushing even though it feels like a cement wall, but I think about my teachers, my friends, the children I work with, and my family. It drives me to be the person I am today and I will never stop for me or for others because that’s just who I am as a young Indigenous woman with big dreams.

My message to the youth is: Don’t give up no matter how hard things get. Try your best and it’ll pay off someday. Don’t let anyone pick for you, follow what you want because you know what’s best for you. Love the people who love you because things change throughout life. Appreciate the little things, because some don’t have what you have and remember to treat people how you want to be treated.


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